Operators Operating Operationally.

This is a military blog that features pictures and videos of weapons, vehicles, and the individuals who use them on a daily basis.
I find a portion of these pictures from military_armies. Thanks to him for letting me use so many of his great photos.
Enjoy.

Color Photographs of Hungarian Armor during WWII

Top: Turan II

Mid: Toldi Light Tank

Bottom: Nimrod Self-Propelled AA

Not taking any of it.

In response to a death due to Palestinian sniper fire from the Gaza Strip, IDF armor mans the border as a show of force while engineers mend the fence that an IDF soldier had died fixing.

Thanks for the new tanks, chaps!

Rhodesian military shown in these photos working on T-55’s gifted to them by the South Africans in effort to help with their war against Communism.

German soldiers sitting on top of an abandoned T-35.
It’s been well known that the T-35 was a failure of massive proportions. However, this did not stop Axis soldiers from using their empty hulls as photo shoot opportunities. If you had ever wondered how big the T-35 was, this is an appropriate size comparison.

German soldiers sitting on top of an abandoned T-35.

It’s been well known that the T-35 was a failure of massive proportions. However, this did not stop Axis soldiers from using their empty hulls as photo shoot opportunities. If you had ever wondered how big the T-35 was, this is an appropriate size comparison.

The M163
Because when your APC’s start to go obsolete, why not just fill the crew compartment with huge stashes of ammunition for a 20mm Vulcan gatling cannon? 
All jokes aside, the M163 was designed to be a competitor to the ZSU-23-4, AKA the “Shilka”. They were used to support ground units from aerial attacks, but were also used as indirect support weapons, firing on anything they could depress their guns far enough to shoot. Overall, the M163 “VADS” had an unimpressive career as mobile AA. It was later replaced by the M1097 Avenger and the M6 Linebacker.

The M163

Because when your APC’s start to go obsolete, why not just fill the crew compartment with huge stashes of ammunition for a 20mm Vulcan gatling cannon? 

All jokes aside, the M163 was designed to be a competitor to the ZSU-23-4, AKA the “Shilka”. They were used to support ground units from aerial attacks, but were also used as indirect support weapons, firing on anything they could depress their guns far enough to shoot. Overall, the M163 “VADS” had an unimpressive career as mobile AA. It was later replaced by the M1097 Avenger and the M6 Linebacker.

Through the eyes of the hunter.
An M1 Abrams sets its sights on an enemy T-72 during an engagement in the Gulf war. 

Through the eyes of the hunter.

An M1 Abrams sets its sights on an enemy T-72 during an engagement in the Gulf war. 

M75 Armored Personnel Carrier.

Considered a forefather to the M113 family, the M75 was built on the chassis of the M18 “Hellcat”, an agile American tank destroyer built during WWII. And though, the M113 claims its roots from this armored combat vehicle, they do have a few distinct differences. The M75 is not heralded as an “Amphibious” craft, its armor ranged from 1in-1.75 inches of steel, unlike the M113’s .47-1in of aluminum, and the M75 is not made to be air-dropped into a combat zone. Though, the M75 did house its engine in the front of the vehicle in order to promote crew protection, and its primary armament was a .50 caliber machine gun, but in a similar turret mount to the M26 Pershing tank’s commander cupola.

Additionally, an M20 Super Bazooka was carried along with 10 rockets, and 180 rounds of ammunition for an M1 or M2 carbine in the cargo area.

Königstigers in France.

Königstigers in France.